Financial expert lays out Tex McIver's financial situation durin - CBS46 News

Financial expert lays out Tex McIver's financial situation during murder trial

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ATLANTA (CBS46) -

Testimony continued on Tuesday, Day 18, in the murder trial of the Tex McIver, the Atlanta attorney accused of killing his wife.

A financial expert testified on Tuesday about McIver’s financial state on the day he shot and killed his wife, Diane. Dean Driskell told the jury that had it not been for his wife giving him money, McIver would have been negative $5,000 in his bank account.

“Mr. McIver’s cash position significantly worsened in the years leading up to his wife’s death,” Driskell said.

Driskell told the jury he crunched numbers for close to 35,000 pages of documents related to McIver’s finances.

“What I noticed very quickly is more money was going out than what was coming in,” Driskell said.

He said between 2013 and 2016, the cash going into McIver’s accounts decreased by 54 percent because of a position change at his law firm.

“His salary was cut in half,” Chief Assistant District Attorney Clint Rucker asked?

“More than half,” Driskell answered.

The state had Driskell read an email McIver sent to Diane three months before he shot her.

“I am seriously trying to reduce my monthly expenses,” Tex wrote. “Debt is my biggest concern right now. Plan on hitting the lotto sometime this week.”

Diane answered, “Make sure you read Javier’s job description. That is your life’s future. You will be standing there with your hand out when I get home every Friday.”

The defense pointed out that Diane’s response was light-hearted. They added that McIver needed Diane to live so his finances wouldn’t get worse.

“If he doesn’t have access to cash that’s in Diane’s estate, his cash flow problems were not as bad before Diane died because she was giving him money every month.”

But the state said that’s not the case. McIver collected a $600,000 life insurance policy of Diane’s, along with close to $300,000 from her 401k.

McIver had a $1 million retirement plan, but the financial expert testified that based on his cost of running the ranch that money would have only lasted him two years. 

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