If 2020 was a worm, it would be a Hammerhead. Over 100 of the bizarre looking species have been spotted in Georgia.

The creep factor is off the charts for this snake-like worm that’s darn near alien like. It eats itself when its hungry, and even regenerates and clones itself if you try to kill it.

The Hammerhead earthworm is indigenous to Asia, but has invaded the Peach State.

James Murphy, UGA's agriculture extension agent, says the cannibal preys on earthworms and snails. It was most recently spotted Nov. 11 in Stockbridge, Georgia, and on Nov. 6 in southeast Atlanta.

Inspired by its Venus flytrap shaped head, Hammerheads grow a full foot long, and its mouth is located on its belly.

"They look scary, they look like something from another planet," Murphy said. "If you cut it in half and you leave it be you are gonna have two worms."

Oh, but it gets better, If you touch the worm it releases a toxin. Not enough to kill you, but it could make your dogs or kids sick if they consumed.

"It’s a very potent neurotoxin," Murphy added. He suggests, if you spot the slimy creeper call the Department of Natural Resources, or take a photo and submit it to iNaturalist—a social media platform that allows users to share their observations of nature.

You can also trap the monster worm by using boiling water, or stuff  it in a plastic bag filled with salt, or citrus oil, or paper towels to dry it out. Otherwise, it will regenerate.

Copyright 2020 WGCL-TV (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.

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