(Meredith) - A San Francisco teacher diagnosed with breast cancer will have to cover the cost of her own substitute for the remainder of the school year while on medical leave.

The second-grade teacher, who works at Glen Park Elementary and wishes to remain anonymous, is required by California state law to cover her sub's wages.

Some parents were outraged upon hearing the news.

"She's an incredible teacher and that's not fair. That's crazy!" parent Elia Hernandez told KGO-TV.

In San Francisco, teachers are given 10 sick days per year. After using their sick time, they will get an additional 100 days of medical leave. During those 100 days, they will be paid their regular salary minus the cost of a sub -- which can range from $174.66 to $240.26 per day, according to the San Francisco Chronicle.

If more time is needed, teachers can tap into a catastrophic sick leave bank -- which contains sick days donated by other teachers in the district. A teacher can draw 85 days from the bank.

The law also allows districts to deduct the pay of a substitute even if a substitute was not hired.

California State Senator Connie Leyva said she will review the law in an interview with NBC Bay Area

"Candidly, I think that times have changed and it’s our job to change with the times," said Leyva.

In the meantime, parents and supporters have reportedly donated more than $13,000 to the teacher. That amount is enough to help her fund the substitute's pay through the end of the school year.

Copyright 2019 Meredith Corporation. All rights reserved.

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